An Apocalyptic Shift At Eyebeam 4/26/2012

An epic evening for the Flock House Project thanks to musicians and artists like Yoshi Sodeoka, Sabrina Ratte, Max Hattler, Sara Ludy, Young Magic, Warm Ghost, and Chrome Canyon, among others. Curated by Ian Daniel.

What have you done to prepare for December 21st? Built a bomb shelter? Bought a boat? Constructed a green house?

Regardless of the measures you’ve taken (or lack there of), you should check out Apocalyptic Shift, a Flock House Project Benefit that imagines a post-industrial landscape centralized around migratory, public, sculptural habitats that are movable, modular, and able to merge. The event combines music, video, technology, and performance to create a digital dystopia, and is going down at Eyebeam Art + Technology Center on April 26, from 7-12 PM, in collaboration with Fellow Mary Mattingly’s Flock House Project and curated by Ian Daniel.

Inspired by global human migration, immigration and pilgrimage, Flock House is built upon reclaimed, redesigned, and rethought materials within a culture. With wider adoption of natural systems like rainwater capture, inner-city agriculture, and solar energy harnessing, the project attempts to create mobile living systems that are interstitial, simultaneously autonomous and dependent on their local community, and shared amongst human beings. – The Creators Project

“Return to Sender” Project Description:
During his time in Flock House he will walk around the neighborhoods surrounding the Bronx Museum making pictures that fall within the traditions established by postcard aesthetics. He will then select 5 images to be made into numbered postcard editions of 100 (500 postcards in total). Each card will state the images location, be stamped and self-addressed to the institution. He will then become a representative of Flock House within the Bronx Museum and greet visitors with a postcard that they may take and mail back with a message to the project and museum. The act of traveling through the mail gives the image a life in the present, retaining the physical imprints of its journey.

Using the Flock House as a platform for connectivity and interactivity, his project offers museum visitors the opportunity to directly participate in and affect the outcome of a pedagogical aesthetic. As a model of education, the museum as conceptual interior offers information and experience through various aesthetic forms and activities. In this work, the museum-goer is given an opportunity to venture into the world and return an image of its surrounding geography, renewed by the marks of its travels. In the moment of its return, the postcard and its sender educate the museum by way of their journey.

Scott Patrick Wiener (b. 1977. Baltimore, MD) spent most of his early life traveling from one military base to another, never spending more than four years in one place at a time. The work he produces is a direct result of an attempt to hold onto time and place – to stabilize it. He proceeds accordingly by using lens-based media to reference past personal or socio-historic events reinforcing their antagonistic specificity as objects in the present. He has attended Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture (Class of 2010) and is the recipient of a 2009-10 DAAD (German Academic Exchange Service) Scholarship for Fine Arts in Leipzig, Germany. Wiener has shown both nationally and internationally and currently resides in Boston, MA where he teaches at Brandeis University, Middlesex and Bunker Hill Community Colleges.

Action 3 News, “Flock Houses in Omaha,” April 2014

Katie Knapp Schubert, “Flock House project opens at Omaha’s Bemis Center,” Omaha Public Radio, March 2014

Rob Colvin, “Stress-Test Architecture,” DWELL, March 2013

Cate McQuaid, “What’s Up at Boston-Area Art Galleries,” The Boston Globe, March 2013

Anne Mancuso, “Photography Shows and Discussions in the Parks,” The New York Times, July 2012

Nick Miller, “Flock Houses Land in New York’s Public Spaces,” The Architect’s Newspaper Blog, July 2012

Martha Schwendener, “Contemop Boat Artists Float Their Ideas,” The Village Voice, July 2012

Amelia Reid, “The Art of Living: The Flock House Project,” Komai, July 2012

Fox News, “Flock Houses Appear in NYC,” July 2012

Janet Upadhye, “Artist Lives in Futuristic Pod for Flock House,” DNA Info, July 2012

“The Flock House Project, Brooklyn,” News 12, July 2012 HERE and HERE

“Artists, Environmentalists and Engineers Bring ‘The Flock House Project’ To New York City,” Huffington Post, July 2012

“Another Broadway Building Going Condo,” Tribeca Citizen, July 2012

Andy Cush, “My Evening In Battery Park’s $960-Per-Square-Foot Art Project,” Animal New York

“Events: The Flock House Project,” CBS News, June 2012

“From the Home Front: Affordable Floating Homes,” Oregon Live, June 2012

“Flock Houses Land in City Parks,” Curbed New York, June 2012

“Parasitic Geodesic Flock House Pops Up in Battery Park,” Inhabitat New York, June 2012

“Join Artist Mary Mattingly’s Latest Sustainable Floating Commune, the Flock House Project,” Art + Auction, June 2012

“Ghana Think Tank at Flock House Microsphere – A Talk with Christopher Robbins & Mary Mattingly,” Queens Museum of Art, June 2012

Joshua Kogan, “Designing Preparative Infrastructure,” Localflux, June 2012

River to River: Flock House

The Creator’s Project: An Apocalyptic Shift at Eyebeam

Culturebot: Flock House at Eyebeam

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